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20121110
20121110
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
in boston. no american official knew where he was. it's hard to prove negatives but we have 6000 documents from the bin laden compound that have been translated. if there's there is a smoking gun, proving official pakistani passivity operations are not so good that we would not pointed out publicly at this point. >> the difference between diplomats and journalists is that journalists say more than they know and diplomats no morew more than they say. but we are in harmony on this one. [laughter] there is no evidence i have seen that there was high-level complicity or knowledge about him being in abbottabad. this led to the problem that if you don't know you can be a accused of and confidence in this was a domestic issue but that is a different question than we are talking about. there is to my knowledge no evidence that they knew that he was there during that time. >> one quick follow up, al qaeda tried to kill general musharraf. al qaeda was at war with the pakistani state and the pakistani state is quite helpful with the operational commander of 9/11. we have had pakistani help reticular
of world boston. as we head into the pam assessing the aftermath of the arab spring, allow me to thank todd, president and ceo of the world affairs councils of america, his crack staff, national council chair, laurie murray, and our many sponsors for this significantly stimulating conference thus far. [applause] like america, i am a wash in debt. it's time to make good on those obligations to each here on the panel who i'm honored to present. i had the pleasure of hearing at dozens of universities in the boston area. i'm owing you a way overdue invitation to the council downtown. professor is a senior fellow at the saban center at brookings institution, a distinguished former and current adviser to government agencies, u.s. leaders, and diplomats, and he's a prolific and best-selling author. i'll quote from the top of the website at the university of maryland where he is the professor of peace and development. i have always believed that good scholarship can be relevant and consequential for public policy. it is possible to effect public policy without being an advocate, to be passionate ab
killed in an gauzy by ignoring sharia law. joining me now, andrew boston, the author of the new book, sharia versus freedom, the legacy of islamic totalitarianism. it is great to have you with us. we appreciate it. let's start with, first, the idea that sharia law, a lot of people this message saying it is a cultural aspect of the islamic life that poses no threat to america. your thoughts. >> sharia is really foundational in islamic societies. it is derived from the text of islam, the traditions of mohammad demanded has many ritual aspects that might be similar to other religions demand but it is also an entire political system. and here is where it runs afoul of modern human rights concepts like our bill of rights, the universal declaration of human rights. it includes a timeless war doctrine. it also rejects basic human freedoms like freedom of conscience, freedom of speech, and it imposes discriminatory regulation, legal regulations against non muslim minorities and women. also includes dehumanizing punishments are well we would consider dehumanizing punishments like flashing for
. >> laura: in the last three days. everyone from boeing, to cat pillar, lock keyed harr continue, boston scientific, these are thousands of jobs if you add them all up. >> yeah. >> laura: what's going on here. a lot of them citing obama care because of the implementing cost of that. >> nothing related to the election of the president should be a reason why anybody is going through layoffs. it's not like it was a surprise that the president could have won re-election on tuesday. that should have been something that people maybe put a part of their first alert forecast for a long time. and anybody who needs to lay off workers right now, they had systemic problems long before tuesday. >> laura: businesses aren't making legitimate business decisions exside technology, bristol myers. >> they might be legitimate business decisions but it's not because of the results of the election. come on. >> laura: some of them are actually saying it's the result of the election. >> they may be saying it to absolve them of their own i how the business has or has not grown, really come on. >> laura: you thin
have a sense of place. so we're talking from new orleans to new delhi, from bangkok to boston, across the world we're looking for those places that you kind of want to keep to yourself but you know you have to share. >> and we're not talking just the five stars, the white linen restaurants. we're talking your food trucks, your greasy spoons, all of them? >> i'm thinking brasseries but also food trucks, as you said, street food stalls, kabob stands, anything that you love. when you think about what is that one meal that i want to have in that destination that really signifies the place, that's what we're talking about. we want people to feel that hometown pride, whether it's a place they live or travel to and they know the secret spot so we can get everybody out of their hotel rooms so they're not having necessarily a cold room service burger and they're experiencing the place. because after all when you're in a restaurant that really is a local place, that's when you're really going to have a sense of place and really feel like you're experiencing that destination. >> absolutely. i un
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)

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